Why Small, Private Airports Are Critical in the Transportation Sector

Aubrey Gladstone pic

Aubrey Gladstone
Image: gladstoneconsulting.com

An experienced business consultant, Aubrey Gladstone has operated his consulting firm Gladstone Consulting, Inc., for more than 20 years. Aubrey Gladstone also has more than 35 years of experience as a pilot and advocates for the growth of small airports.

Small airports benefit the economy and the general airport system in a number of ways. First, small airports keep private traffic away from major commercial airports. If a small, single-person aircraft had to land at a major airport, it would take up a slot that could be used by a commercial jet with over 150 passengers.

Secondly, private airports are critical to the business aviation sector, which sustains 1.2 million high-wage jobs in the United States and accounts for $150 billion per year in the U.S. economy. In large part, this is due to the manufacturing jobs created by the demand for business aircraft.

Lastly, small airports allow passengers to visit remote places without access to major commercial airlines. Of the 5,000 public-use airports in the country, only 500 receive commercial airlines. This access to remote areas benefits not only businesses, but also residents of these areas who require emergency travel for medical purposes, making private airports a vital part of the U.S. aviation industry.